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The print out is from VW Auto data from VW databases. The local garages will access these systems via licence to see the relevant service details and requirements, same for other makes and models. It's not just a print out from some local garage.
Autodata good. But it's not manufacturers data. It certainly doesn't directly access actual VW data. They've choose to align with VW UK on this.
Which is why this debate rolls on and on.
I'll follow the manufacturers recommendations (not VW UK) and my own decisions.
 

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It's nonsense, and all about aggressive profiteering by creating fear.... And most people respond to fear, uncertainty and doubt, especially if they are prone to give money away!

Modern cambelts (and tensioners) are extremely sturdy, and the materials used in them these days do not "age" like early cambelts did, if not used much. Sure, big mileage is different matter, as that really does relate to wear (as does regular high RPM which is always a wear factor).

I would get an inspection of the belt for wear before deciding to change it - for a low-mileage car - and unless it looks obviously old and tired (unlikely for most cars of low mileage), I'd leave it alone.

Worriers should just pay out to feel less stressed!
 

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VW Golf GTI MK5 2007. VW Westfalia Camper 1984. Audi TT Mk1.
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VW are hugely expensive indeed. One instance of someone comparing the cost of Oil & Filter change that amounted to over £350. This at some places like Halfords or Speedy Exhaust & Tyres Services would cost you just about £50 - £60. So I would advise you to either look out for a trusted local mechanic or look for a ‘Who can fix my car’ etc. There is no virtue in lining the pockets of the Dealerships so you can talk to suited salespersons and a cup of complementary coffee.
 

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Good points, but I have literally watched a lot more checks being done on my car with a dealer service than just a simple oil/filter change alone... No sales people anywhere near! Do Halfords etc check all the same things? Maybe... I'm not supporting the idea of dealership services, or their prices here, but the principle is about making sure to compare "like for like". A good independent should know all the tests and do them, and have all the computer kit, and should be able to be cheaper than a dealer... The trick is finding one.
 

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VW Golf GTI MK5 2007. VW Westfalia Camper 1984. Audi TT Mk1.
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My Pet Mechanic has a Hand held computer which he can plug into the car and see what is happening with the car. Without this - no one can ever even begin to sort out the modern day cars. Also - as someone has stated - there are too many “scaring talks” about and ways of convincing you to part with your money. Do please look around and see what’s what and who is there able todo the same job for about the1/4 of the price the dealerships charge. Just think - their mechanics get paid the same as the independent mechanics - but you don’t get the ‘free coffee’. The sooner you get out of the habit of using the main dealers - the better for your pocket.
 

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VW Golf GTI MK5 2007. VW Westfalia Camper 1984. Audi TT Mk1.
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GATES do whole kit that they supply to VW (I think). I fitted one to my Audi TT. Just about £120 for the Cambelt, Tensioner and the Water Pump. Another £100 to your friendly mechanism - and first class job done with the original equipment VW/Audi use.
 

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The Cambelt topic causes more interest and opinions than my favourite Tepid Seats topic. lol.

I thought the belt was made with added metal these day. Surely you can not go on time alone. If at five years old one car has done 5000 miles and another car has done 80 000 miles, how can they both need the belts changing at the same time?

I had a similar debate with an Optician about monthly contact lens. If one person wears them for two hours a day twice a week and another person wears them for ten hours a day seven days a week, how can they both need changing at the same time. He did not have an answer only to say that is the recommendation.

I am sure someone made a good point on here in another post on the subject saying the belt could be two years old on the dealers shelf before being sold. Does that mean it will need changing in three years?

I always drive nice and relaxed hardly ever going over 3000 RPM in the congested traffic and even on the motorway my speed is never more than 60 MPH so less than 2500 RPM. Also i only do 1000 miles a year so if i still have the car in 2024 when its five years old i will not be changing the cambelt.

Just a note. Not all VW main dealers are money grabbers. When i had the service last year i was told that an advisory Air Con Service was recommended in the report. When i questioned this with reception i was told this is a recommendation for all cars, but there is no way my car needs it and i should not bother. As i have said before it looks like my VW main dealer is one of the rare good ones.

Who knows. Perhaps they will say the same about the cambelt when the car is five years old and not to bother.
 

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The Cambelt topic causes more interest and opinions than my favourite Tepid Seats topic. lol.

I thought the belt was made with added metal these day. Surely you can not go on time alone. If at five years old one car has done 5000 miles and another car has done 80 000 miles, how can they both need the belts changing at the same time?

I had a similar debate with an Optician about monthly contact lens. If one person wears them for two hours a day twice a week and another person wears them for ten hours a day seven days a week, how can they both need changing at the same time. He did not have an answer only to say that is the recommendation.

I am sure someone made a good point on here in another post on the subject saying the belt could be two years old on the dealers shelf before being sold. Does that mean it will need changing in three years?

I always drive nice and relaxed hardly ever going over 3000 RPM in the congested traffic and even on the motorway my speed is never more than 60 MPH so less than 2500 RPM. Also i only do 1000 miles a year so if i still have the car in 2024 when its five years old i will not be changing the cambelt.

Just a note. Not all VW main dealers are money grabbers. When i had the service last year i was told that an advisory Air Con Service was recommended in the report. When i questioned this with reception i was told this is a recommendation for all cars, but there is no way my car needs it and i should not bother. As i have said before it looks like my VW main dealer is one of the rare good ones.

Who knows. Perhaps they will say the same about the cambelt when the car is five years old and not to bother.
Absolutely correct. Another guise for dealerships to wrench open the pockets of owners who are easily frightened into tall storIes. 70,000 - 80,000 miles is about right. Also there are many cheapo products about - so care is required to buy good quality products. I get GATES timing belt, tensioner and water pump kit. They do them for most cars - specially VW, Audi and BMW. My Audi TT kit cost £120.
 

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Im going through the same dilemma.

Ive recently taken ownership of a 2013 Up Black Edition, which must be one of the lowest mileage examples there is, its only past 7000 miles before christmas.
I know the cars full history, and even sat in the car when it was brand new in the showroom, but due to the cars age, nine yrs old in March, the timing belt has not been changed

Its been inspected, and looks in perfect condition, but im not taking the risk, its being done in the next few weeks.
The condition of the car, is remarkable, and its something i cannot put off indefinitely. Its now or never
 

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get GATES timing belt, tensioner and water pump kit
I'm sure it's fine, but common Gates kit these days is generic stuff made in China - probably identical to many other brands, bar the labelling....

Very few US brands make parts in the US, same with everyone, really. I tend to look for "Made in Germany" or "Made in EU" if possible, for critical parts, but it's very had to know sometimes!
 

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VW Golf GTI MK5 2007. VW Westfalia Camper 1984. Audi TT Mk1.
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Im going through the same dilemma.

Ive recently taken ownership of a 2013 Up Black Edition, which must be one of the lowest mileage examples there is, its only past 7000 miles before christmas.
I know the cars full history, and even sat in the car when it was brand new in the showroom, but due to the cars age, nine yrs old in March, the timing belt has not been changed.

Its been inspected, and looks in perfect condition, but im not taking the risk, its being done in the next few weeks.
The condition of the car, is remarkable, and its something i cannot put off indefinitely. Its now or never
The recommended change of Timing Belt is 60,000 miles. So you don’t need to change it just yet. The Timing Belts are very well manufactured and will hold good for the milage quoted (60,000 miles). There is the Water Pump that is replaced along with the Timing Belt Tensioners when changing the Timing Belt. Big Job costing big bucks. I would keep driving the Car for the next 40,000 miles at leas and get the whole lot done at the same time as the labour cost of just changing the one item is the same as changing all 3 at the same time (more or less).
 

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I'm sure it's fine, but common Gates kit these days is generic stuff made in China - probably identical to many other brands, bar the labelling....

Very few US brands make parts in the US, same with everyone, really. I tend to look for "Made in Germany" or "Made in EU" if possible, for critical parts, but it's very had to know sometimes!
You are right - China does make most things now a days. Even all Apple IPads Computers are beautifully Designed in USA and beautifully Made in China.
But I do believe Gates Timing Belt, Tensioners and Water Pumps are No1 Quality products.
I brought a Timing Belt, Tensioner and Water Pump from EURO CAR PARTS - got it to our Mechanic and the water Pump fell apart in his hands. What a load of rubbish indeed. Went and got it replaced and fitted to the car - it lasted a few weeks before water leaked all over the engine. Good job - as the Timing Belt held and I was able to replace the whole lot with Gates Kit. Still good and together after many years.
 

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The recommended change of Timing Belt is 60,000 miles. So you don’t need to change it just yet. The Timing Belts are very well manufactured and will hold good for the milage quoted (60,000 miles). There is the Water Pump that is replaced along with the Timing Belt Tensioners when changing the Timing Belt. Big Job costing big bucks. I would keep driving the Car for the next 40,000 miles at leas and get the whole lot done at the same time as the labour cost of just changing the one item is the same as changing all 3 at the same time (more or less).
Actually the recommended interval of INSPECTION of the timing belt is 160,000 miles, and only replace if the inspection reveals an issue.

Water pump doesn't require replacing as it's not driven by the timing belt like many other cars.
 

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A timing belt, is probably the only perishable item, that no sensible car owner, should overlook.

Most of us do not begrudge, paying sometimes large insurance premiums for our car, yet when it comes to probably the most vital component on the car, some of us, think, i can put it off for another year, as ive only covered a small annual mileage, and anyway, it wont break.

The thought of having to pay close to £300 in the next few weeks, for a replacement of a component, that may not need replacement, does not upset me, as ive budgeted for this expected visit to the garage, after all, the car is nearly nine yrs old, way past the time, when a belt should have been replaced.
 

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The Cambelt topic causes more interest and opinions than my favourite Tepid Seats topic. lol.

I thought the belt was made with added metal these day. Surely you can not go on time alone. If at five years old one car has done 5000 miles and another car has done 80 000 miles, how can they both need the belts changing at the same time?

I had a similar debate with an Optician about monthly contact lens. If one person wears them for two hours a day twice a week and another person wears them for ten hours a day seven days a week, how can they both need changing at the same time. He did not have an answer only to say that is the recommendation.

I am sure someone made a good point on here in another post on the subject saying the belt could be two years old on the dealers shelf before being sold. Does that mean it will need changing in three years?

I always drive nice and relaxed hardly ever going over 3000 RPM in the congested traffic and even on the motorway my speed is never more than 60 MPH so less than 2500 RPM. Also i only do 1000 miles a year so if i still have the car in 2024 when its five years old i will not be changing the cambelt.

Just a note. Not all VW main dealers are money grabbers. When i had the service last year i was told that an advisory Air Con Service was recommended in the report. When i questioned this with reception i was told this is a recommendation for all cars, but there is no way my car needs it and i should not bother. As i have said before it looks like my VW main dealer is one of the rare good ones.

Who knows. Perhaps they will say the same about the cambelt when the car is five years old and not to bother.
Cambelt is PTFE reinforced and the cam gears are trioval.
 

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