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I recently cleaned the drums and shoes on the wife's UP as one of them was totally seized. On inspection, the handbrake operating lever that attaches to the shoe was seized solid to the shoe in the locked position, the other one was almost as bad.
Gave everything a good clean and refitted, brake now working as normal again, but only perhaps for a wee while. Plan to fit new shoes in the coming weeks. I did the front discs and pads the tail end of last year, after about 20K, as they were totally screwed. Believe VW must have been scraping the bottom of the parts bin when using these parts. We also have an almost nine year old Corsa and a seven year old Agila, with way more mileage. Both still on original shoes!!!
The swept areas and size of the discs is not great.. The lack of bite area could wear out pads quite quickly. Even on the GTI......If I’m honest I don’t rate the brakes on my GTI at all. They lack feel and the power is poor. I’ve stripped and serviced them and lubed with Ceratec but they aren’t great. I will be changing the fluid when I get time but at 19 months old and 11K miles I’m not expecting any gains,.
More on topic if it’s going to cause issue for you daughter consider the rear calliper conversion from Upgrade Haus. I think they have the conversion on offer around £450 which isn’t that bad. Fitting a piece of cake 👍👍👍
 

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I parked my 2017 Up TSI in my underground garage in Brussels two weeks ago, after driving here in a rainstorm. Tried to move the car last night to load it up for a trip back to the U.K. today. Both rear wheels were locked solid. When I eventually managed to brutally unstick them by driving backwards and forwards, the right hand drum was making a rhythmic banging noise as the wheel turned. The brake pedal could be pushed into the carpet and brake fluid was dripping from the drum. The car was towed to a brake repair centre today. The lining had come off one shoe and was stuck to the drum and the brake cylinder was leaking fluid. As I type this, the car is having both drums, both wheel cylinders and all the brake shoes replaced. Not great for a 3 year old car.
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I think you were a bit too brutal with your method of unsticking your rear shoes!

If you can, if you have time and if you have a jack, then I would suggest that removing the wheel and whacking the offending drum(s) with a rubber mallet just might save you a lot of grief and money.
 

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If it happens again, even better solution is to remove the drum, clean the dust out, and slightly roughen the shoes with some 120 grit wet & dry. That's all they need, and this used to be part of the service schedule back in the day when most cars have drums, done every year, and they never stuck. It's either been left out of the service schedule deliberately, or not included by accident, as most VW products have had discs now for a long time.
I cleaned out my daughter's GTI drums a few months ago, (2 years old), and it's never done it since. I also did mine as a precaution on the same day, but mine weren't sticking after 2 years.
 
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Yep, all about maintenance.
I recall the olden days of 3k mile oil changes, and back then you checked and cleaned out and adjusted your brakes at least twice a year, if you liked good and straight stopping.
Today, I suppose there is an app that does all that :)
 

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I agree about regular maintenance but the fact is not everyone knows how to strip these drum brakes and even if they do why the friar should they have too !
There are a few cars that still use drums like the Ford Fiesta for instance and we’ve had several of those without a single hint of a problem.
It’s 2021 yet I dare not apply my handbrake because it’s likely to stick. Often we say here how even minor mods to cars Must be declared to our insurance companies. I wonder what our insurance companies would think if we declared we don’t use the Park/Handbrake because they seize ….
Crap materials or design is to blame here.

I will say though that my drums have never stuck but I take care not to apply the handbrake. Fortunately I park on dead flat ground. And of course leave it in gear…
 

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I live in (very damp) Cornwall near the sea; it's pretty wet these days as the climate shifts.
I often drive through pools of water. mostly because the drains are often not maintained near here (often blocked with rotting leaves).
I leave my car for several days, sometimes, without using it, as we can walk to the beach and several supermarkets, which we do a lot.
I'd like my garage to check the rear drums as part of a service, like I used to do, but if not I'll do it myself - no big deal.
Next time, I'll get disks all round, on my electric made-in-China-appliance.... They'll likely be running the UK by then :)
 

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I've had this problem since about December 2016 (when I parked my 62 Up in Manchester airport car park for a week over Xmas).
At the last garage service (I'm not mechanically minded) they cleaned it up, but it still happens.
Would replacing the pads (and/or?) drums fix the issue?
And if so, any particular brand?
Thanks in advance
p
 

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I've had this problem since about December 2016 (when I parked my 62 Up in Manchester airport car park for a week over Xmas).
At the last garage service (I'm not mechanically minded) they cleaned it up, but it still happens.
Would replacing the pads (and/or?) drums fix the issue?
And if so, any particular brand?
Thanks in advance
p
It’s possible that a different brand of drum or friction material might help. If it did then it would identify the problem as being poor quality materials used by VW when they built the cars.
 

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Sounds likely...

As with many components, there will likely be several suppliers, and maybe some, or some batches of parts, have been of poor quality. Still unacceptable though... This may explain why many owners seem unaffected by rear brake problems, even those of us that live in wet places and sometimes don't drive much.
 

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Sounds likely...

As with many components, there will likely be several suppliers, and maybe some, or some batches of parts, have been of poor quality. Still unacceptable though... This may explain why many owners seem unaffected by rear brake problems, even those of us that live in wet places and sometimes don't drive much.
Steve I think my rear brakes are unaffected because I don’t use the handbrake. Which in itself is ridiculous.
 

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Noticed a 6 inch drag mark on the drive yesterday and after speaking to my son he confirmed a drum was binding. Car is driven 60 miles daily Monday to Friday and 20 miles daily over the weekend.

One drum was reluctant to come off and was found to be heavily corroded and the cause of the binding. The other was in good condition but both were filled with lots of brake dust.

I cleaned out the dust and wire brushed the drums before cleaning with brake cleaner. Roughened the shoes, then carefully lubricated the pivot points before refitting. I will now do this annually before winter. Hopefully this has sorted it.

I can only conclude that water has got in one side and I suspect it might be from the pressure washer.
 

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Drum brakes are comparatively high maintenance - people forget how it used to be like when you had to fix/maintain something on a car every weekend! I'm not certain it's an Up! issue any more than with other cars with drums, and given the pandemic (i.e. less driving) makes it worse. I never get an issue with mine, even in super-damp Cornwall, and being by the sea air, probably because the car goes on wine and beer trips 3-4 times a week! :)
 

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I think there be a problem in the future with EV''s which have both discs and regenerative braking. The discs will get little use and corrode much quicker in our wet winter climate. An unintended consequence that could be costly for EV owners.
 

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The drums on my Up TSI always stick in the winter months .
I have found the best way to free them is to do a gentle reverse first.
So far it has worked every time with no rubber marks left on the road.
 

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Digressing a little, but as a few have mentioned – I thought it was good practice to park in gear (1st if facing uphill/reverse if facing downhill and both with front wheels pointing towards the kerb) – this was what I was taught x-decades ago when learning to drive.



Handbrakes are just that – to use by hand when pulling away because you need your right foot on the accelerator-pedal rather than the brake-pedal.



I’ve never left a manual car with the handbrake on. I remember seeing my brother-in-law’s Saxo VTS (c. 20+ years ago!!) rolling down the gentle hill his folk lived on because he had had a spirited drive on the way there, left his handbrake on, the discs had cooled down and the handbrake had released its grip. Luckily, he saw this in time and had his keys in his pockets and ran down the road in time to jump-in before it hit anything…!!



So, my advice would be to park in gear regardless and this would also negate any drum seizing issues….
 

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Sure, but check rule 239 of the highway code here:
Waiting and parking (238 to 252) - The Highway Code - Guidance - GOV.UK

I don't really care but it's interesting to read what's in code!

I wonder if there are conceivable situations where you might get insurance payout complications if it can be shown you were contravening the code (albeit, the code is not necessarily a specific legal obligation).
 
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