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Discussion Starter #1
Right so I've got a Move UP! And it doesn't have a button to turn the traction control/ESP off and I was wondering if anyone knew where the ESP is located under the bonnet and if you knew any modifications as to how to turn it off? If not just locating it under the bonnet would be great, thanks :)
 

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Sorry can't help you. Why would you want to turn it off?
 

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I was told by Volkswagen salesman than you cannot turn it off, you can, however not recommended, pull out the fuse for the ABS, and thus it cannot stop the car from blocking the wheels.
 

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It might be illegal to turn of the ESP in many European countries???

If your car was built after 19XX it has to have indicators or savety belts. Cars before don't need it.

All cars before may 2014 did not need to have tyre pressure control.
I know that all (European) VW from June 2014 on have the tyre pressure control as standard ...

Maybe all cars faster than 30 mph need to have ESP to run on European roads since 20XX?
That's why it is no option and you can't turn it off. If you turn it off, you can only run the car on private roads.

Trouble with the police is the minor problem. If you have an accident with a "manipulated car" you might loose your insurance.
 

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Allegedly a trick that works it to get the car up to speed, put it to neutral/no gear, turn off the engine. It's only use is by an advanced driving course, where they demonstrate what happens if you lose control of the car. (And they have a dedicated closed track and drivers with decades of experience. Seriously, don't do this.)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Argh okay, ohh well :) that does sound a bit shady haha I'll have a think about it, thankyou anyway :)
 

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I raised the same question a few months ago, after taking delivery of my Up.

Having owned an Audi A4 and Seat Toledo in the past, both vehicles had a switch that enabled activation/de-activation of the ESP.

However, it would appear that subsequent models I've owned, namely the UP! and a Mercedes Benz A-Class, have done away with the option to disable the ESP.

Even though we didn't see any meaningful snow-fall throughout Winter 2013, it'd still be nice to have the option of disabling the ESP when Winter comes around, as I've been able to, when driving the afore-mentioned VAG vehicles.

However, something tells me that the decision to remove the option has something to do with those who sit in Brussels.
 

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The whole point of having ESP is to help you keep your car on the road and to protect you, your passengers and any other road users from being involved in an accident hopefully.
 

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When I owned my Seat Toledo, I can distinctly recall being caught out in the snow after finishing work one Monday morning, in December 2010.

After I'd watched the snow fall heavily overnight, I left my place of work as approximately three inches lay upon the ground.

Moreover, the gritting trucks that had thundered up and down, past my place of work throughout the night, had done little in terms of shovelling the snow to the side, so much so,a bus that was stuck at the bus stop, a hundred yards away, as I exited the gate even made the front page of my local daily newspaper that same evening.

Enough of doing my best to set the scene.

Around a mile away from my place of work, I'd climbeda hill to junction, where I proceeded to turn left, as I prepared to climb up another hill.

My Seat Toledo, with its ESP engaged didn't turn left. Instead, it proceeded straight ahead with its wheels turned, as a driver of a Citroen C3 descended their way down the hill towards the junction.
Thankfully, I managed to regain control of my Seat, thus avoiding a collision.

After avoiding a collision, I proceeded to struggle up the second hill as the wheels slipped and spun, whilst the ESP light flashedfrantically upon the instrument panel.

Fortunately, I remembered that the owners' manual of the Audi A4, I'd previously owned, recommended that the ESP should be disabled when driving in snow.

After taking the decision to disable the ESP, via the button on the centre console, the wheels of my Toledo suddenly discovered the desired traction to power itself up the second hill and out of danger.






















Edited by: Miserable Git
 
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