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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone got good tips? I've got some, but I'll post one that most people probably don't know:

=> Don't coast out of gear more than is necessary. It uses fuel as the
engine idles. It is much better to remain in gear without depressing the
accelerator pedal, as that uses little or no fuel. You are also more in control with the car in gear, as you are ready to accelerate out of danger if need be. That said, do not
use engine braking to slow down quickly as it strains the gears. Use the
brakes, which is also good for the disks, as it removes rust, and
prolongs life.
 

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Nice thread,
I knew about the gearing using no fuel, but I wasn't aware of the brake discs!

I would add;

In addition to Leif's, not to brake too hard to prolong the life of your brake pads.

And also one that I am often guilty of;

Make sure you aren't carrying any excess weight, in addition, askyour passengers for a small petrol fee, or offer them a leg based travel alternative :p
 

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Vdoug.
I don't think many wives/husbands will approve of the last suggestion. My partner would probably bash me with her handbag.
 

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Switch off the engine when waiting in traffic.

Get advanced training, such as the RoSPA or IAM schemes, as they will teach you how to drive more smoothly, anticipate more and hence save fuel as you're not braking and accelerating again. And it's very instructive and can mean reductions in your insurance.

Nick
 

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If you live close to the shops or giong to a nearby place 'walk', short journey will use more fuel as engine has not warmed up yet, also it may help you loosesome fatreducing additional weight when you do drive
 

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A lot of you probably know this already, but the art of squeezing he maximum mpg out of a car is called hypermiling, and there are some really fanatical people chasing those extra miles. If you search for the term on google you'll find loads of resources. One tip that hasn't been mentioned yet is called ridge riding; I think it basically means that in wet weather, rather than driving in the ruts in the road that have marginally more water and therefore more rolling resistance, it's better to drive slightly to one side (near side probably safer) on the ridges to benefit from the lower amount of water on that part of the road surface and reduce that rolling resistance.

Another tip I wouldn't really recommend is slipstreaming - driving so close to the (preferably large) vehicle in front so as to get 'inside' their aerodynamic slipstream and benefit from reduced wind resistance.

I have read about people attaching springs to their throttle pedal so that there is increased resistance beyond a certain level and therefore promoting a 'lighter foot' driving style. Not sure again how safe that would be - probably invalidate any insurance! I'd be really interested to know if there was an electronic way to limit the amount of acceleration (if you can remap the engine for performance, I'm assuming there must be ways to remap for efficiency as well, at the expense of performance)Edited by: edthedoc
 

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all brilliant points that I shall be taking into account when I get my up :)

also no one has mentioned, usually driving at 50mph in 5th gear is approximatly the most economical speed/gear to drive in,.
 

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The best tip I can think of is to just get into your mind that the brake pedal is the enemy of good mpg (other than when you need to stop of course, at which point the brake pedal is your friend!).

So the most fuel efficient driving is when you let the car naturally slow down by anticipating road conditions and looking ahead for queueing traffic or junctions. Whenever you use the brake you are chucking away all that fuel you used to build up the speed, by just heating your brake disks and pads and losing the energy that way.

Second only to not using the brake would be gentle acceleration. When you accelerate hard the revs go higher and friction in the engine is higher, wasting more energy to heat. Plus by accelerating slower you reduce your overall average speed, which also helps fuel efficiency.

So remember, brake as little as possible and accelerate slowly for the best mpg.

Or walk :)
 

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"Or walk :)"

Love it! Good point!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Collas said:
Switch off the engine when waiting in traffic.

Get advanced training, such as the RoSPA or IAM schemes, as they will teach you how to drive more smoothly, anticipate more and hence save fuel as you're not braking and accelerating again. And it's very instructive and can mean reductions in your insurance.

Nick
I switch off when reasonable.

I also took some IAM lessons, and I do agree that they were very beneficial. Whilst I make no claims about my driving, I am safer than before. Another point is that they teach you to drive more sympathetically, with respect to both other road users (Up drivers are all really nice of course), and the engine. My Ford Ka died at 140,000 miles and 10 years, with the original clutch and exhaust, and the only significant faults being suspension (due to driving on rough country lanes) and rust (poor Ford body). I am convinced the lessons learnt helped the car have less faults. And I am sure it helped me avoid some accidents.

Also, if you have less/no accidents, due to improved driving skills, you'll get lower insurance.
 

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robwoods advice is the best so far. mainly because it is putting it in its simplest form. I am still a member of the IAM and had a lot of years instructing new drivers. I suspect there are other members of the IAM on here and with a bit of luck they should agree with robwoods too.


But don't stop sending in these driving tips. Forget about the "slipstreaming" one, it's highly dangerous. Some people may know it as "Tailgating" of course.



Oh yes I would like to add another twopenny-worth on the safety side of things.. Don't use your cruise control in wet conditions. I only use mine on motorways or long dual carriageways too anyway, butnever use it on any type of road in wet weather.
 
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