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Discussion Starter #1
As you know, on the continent, we measure in km and litres / liters ...


We don't think in "mpg" but "L/100km" ...

Was not easy to find out /calculate what 50 mpg or 60 mpg is ...
1 mile = 1.609 km ...
1 gallon = 4.546 L ...

So, "60 mpg" = (100 x 4.546) / (60 x 1.609) = "4.71 L / 100 km" (short form "4.71 L") ...


Now my Question ...
As far as I remember I saw one petrol station with "gallons" on my first visit to England in 1993?
But I have never seen "gallons" again on the other four England holidays (1996-2002) ...
You count in liters now as we do ...

My up! often tells me between 52 mpg and 61 mpg ...
At the petrol station it was REALLY 48 mpg (21.36 liters for 363 km) ...

How do you count the XY mpg you always mention?

Is it only what your UK version up! display tells you or is it counted with the datd from the pertrol station?
 

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I don't know how others do it but myself I zero in the trip counter when I fill up with petrol. The next time I fill up I take note of the mileage covered and divide it by the litres purchased. This gives me miles per litre and I then multiply this by the number of litres in a gallon which gives me the miles per gallon covered.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Ah!


So, you have 225.6 miles and 21.36 litres, which makes 10.56 mpl ...
And as "being British"* you would never count in "miles per litres" and so need to multiply it with 4.546 to get 48 mpg ...


* As a "continental" some of the British traditions are strange for me/us.
But I accept people being "strange" (as I am very strange myself - even in Germany).
I really do accept that Britain wants to keep some of the "old measurements" (or other traditions).
We would surely all have problems changing to a 10 hours day with 100 minutes per hour or 100 seconds per minute!

So, please don't get me wrong!

I just want to understand your way of "thinking" as you introduced the litre some decades ago ...

By the way - it was the French who created the Meter - not the Germans!

Napoleon brought the meter to Germany (and also riding on the right side!!!). We helped Wellington a bit at Warterloo - but kept "Napoleon's" measurement system ...
 

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Cadfael,
It's all a bit strange with us Brits and our measurements. I'm 40 and was taught in metric at school but there are a few imperial things that we just seems to hang onto.
With petrol we buy it in litres but as you say, we divide the litres by 4.54 to get gallons if we want to work out our mpg. We like our pints of beer, yet if you buy a glass of wine it's usually in centilitres. We like to weigh ourselves in stones and pounds but most things you buy are now measured in metric. For a while weights had to be quoted in in metric and imperial, not sure whether that's still the case. Our older generations tend to hang onto imperial as that's what they would have been taught. As times passes, I'm sure metric will be more and more prevalent, though pints of beer and miles I think are here to stay. Just part of our culture and it would cost lots to change all the road signs to KM!
 

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Cadfael,
All civilised countries use the length known as a chain, (22 yards or 20.17 metres) for the length of a cricket wicket.
Most countries us the length known as a furlong,(201.17 metres)for the far less civilised sport of horse racing.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
We know the furlong as "Achtelmeile" ("quaver mile") in Germany for some "British / US sports"...

Some musicians are also used to "measure" in inch ...
In Germany we also say a 12" or 16" tom or a 14"/5.5" snare ...
No drummer uses the metric system.
Or a 34" long scale / 32" miedium scale / 30" short scle bass guitar ...
Other things cause problems because some US instruments have 6.3 mm pots (potentiometers) while Asian (and "European") instruments have 6 mm pots ...

Yes; changing miles into km would really cost Millions and is not necessary.
Same with the (half) pint ... (I love British bitter and ale) ...

There are some old German measurements too - which have adopted to the metric system during the decades and centuries. Like a "MaÃ" in Bavaria (nowhere else used) is half a litre now. Or the Germand pound (used at the butcher, for coffee) is 500g ...
A "Stange" ("stack") in cologne is a 0.2 litres beer glas.


MPG ...
Do you still use the gallon anywhere else (in normal life)?
Pound (weight), inch or feet are used in every day life and it is surely very hard to change this.
But it seems to me that no one "thinks in gallons" anymore?
 

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Hills used to have signs for example 1 in 7 i.e. the gradient rises (or falls) 1 foot in every 7 foot. Nowadays you will see a sign that says 14%. So 100/14 is 7.14285ft or 2.1771m. It used to be so simple when you saw a sign that said 1 in 4 the brain would register "steep hill" and when a sign said 1 in 20 the opposite.

A length of railway track in the days before welded rail was 22 yards. By timing the time to cover 1/4 mile or 20 "diddly dums" as the train passed over each join and dividing the result into 900 gave you the speed, ie 10 seconds 90mph, 12 was 75mph, 15 was 60. Not sure why 900 but it was my old Dad who taught me that.
 

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I buy petrol in litres and convert it to gallons. We used to buy cheese by ounces or pounds. Now prices in grams so if you require 1/2 a pound, you get a funny look when you ask for 227g
 

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Discussion Starter #9
In Germany we have plastic "beer crates" with 20x 0.5 litres glas bottles inside.
These crates weight about 16 kg each ...

I measure some things in beer crates ...

For instance bass amps or cabinets ...
25 kg says nothing to me - but having to carry 1.5 beer crates ...
 

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The wheel on our cars is quite a strange combination.
eg 175/65 14
175mm width
65% of the width is the profile (depth)
14 represents the diameter of the wheel in inches
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Good example!

The strange wheel classification is the same world-wide ...

And somehow it shows the advantage of both (mm and inch) systems.
13/14/15/16/17 is very easy to imagine for everyone (also used for drum sets) ...

14.25, 14 7/8 is much harder to imagine (at least for continetals) than 170, 175 ...

We had a British supplier (selling Scanning Electron Microscopes). As a skilled industrial mechanic you see advantages of the mm system when you look at technical drawings for precision engeneering ...

The sample stubs used for SEMs world-wide by every manufacturer have "metric names" (12mm / 25 mm stub) but in fact they rely on the inch system! The "3mm universal axis" has 3.1 mm and a 3.2 mm bore (1/8") ...
 

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The 'German Pound'!, does David Cameron know about this?
I'm sure Mrs Merkel must know about it, and as Nigel Farage is famously married to a fine German lady he must know about it as well.
I'm not sure this sort of thing will go down well with the intolerant readers of the Daily Mail newspaper.
and.....
The inch is the basis of the Imperial measures of length, and is now legally defined as exactly 2.54 centimetres. This means that the Imperial units of length are based on the metric system!Edited by: jimv50
 
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