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Discussion Starter #1
Last time I needed new front pads for my Move Up! (at 30,000 mi), National Tyres said I needed new discs too.
The bill was about £250.
Since the parts are very cheap on eBay, I wonder if I can do it myself?
I'm reasonably handy but not got much experience with car maintenance.
(One thing I'm wary of is damaging the ABS — any tips?)
Thanks for any advice.
 

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Fitted these a couple of weeks ago.
Very easy if you have any experience of working on cars, so difficult to comment how it would be for you given your lack of car maintenance experience.
Damaging the ABS would be quite unlikely.
Check out YouTube for some videos. This one is very comprehensive, not in English, but easy to follow.
 

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@wellfan I used to do all my own work on my motorbikes. On the other hand, my brother does most of the work on his own car, so maybe he could help out.
I'm p retty sure I can do the job — just wary of breaking the ABS.
 

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I need to change the discs and pads on ours. I may get around to it tomorrow. If so I'll post some thoughts and maybe photos.
Bit disappointed. Discs are very badly warped at 25k miles. Very poor!!
 

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@Ed463 Thanks - any information would be useful. I just read that there are filters in the ABS system that can become clogged if sludge backflows into them. Apparently if you take about a minute or more to compress the piston, you should avoid this problem.
 

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@wellfan I used to do all my own work on my motorbikes. On the other hand, my brother does most of the work on his own car, so maybe he could help out.
I'm p retty sure I can do the job — just wary of breaking the ABS.
I am also a biker, and have done a fair bit of work on both bike and car. Give it a go with your brothers input, damaging the ABS really should not be a concern as you are not tampering with it.
Have a chat with your brother, and I am sure he will be of great help.
 

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@Ed463 Thanks - any information would be useful. I just read that there are filters in the ABS system that can become clogged if sludge backflows into them. Apparently if you take about a minute or more to compress the piston, you should avoid this problem.
I release the bleed nipple to allow free backward movement of the piston, no danger of backflow to ABS system. If required at end of job, just top up your brake fluid.
 

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Give it go. Changing pads and discs is easy provided you have a bit of basic mechanical skill and the right tools and parts. You should also save yourself quite a bit of dosh.

I would recommend those cheap vizableed one man bleed kits as they make bleeding a piece of cake. Make sure the car is supported properly on jack stands and you might need a (rubber) mallet if the old discs are well stuck on.

Grab some brake cleaner, brake fluid and some anti squeal grease (not copper ease) and you should be good to go.

Take your time, be safe and make sure the brakes are bled properly.
 

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If it's of any use, most of the mechanical components I've encountered on the Up! aren't miles different from the MkII Golfs I worked on as a child, as well as very consistent with equivalent systems across the modern Golf variants we still have in the family. When VAG finds something that works, they stick to it, and they tend to be quite straightforward (it also means that, although there is no Haynes manual for the Up!, if you get one for a similar-vintage Golf/Lupo/Fox it will probably be close enough). I do remember the occasional instance of 'encouragement' with a rubber mallet on the MkIIs, but by and large that was the most complicated part. Make sure you apply some high-temp grease (moly- or silicone-based, not copper as @Percy247 said) to the slide rails of the calipers (where the tabs or 'ears' of the pads rest) to lubricate pad movement along them:
4783

(yellow circles - slider rails; yellow diamonds - pad 'ears'; screen grab from this YouTube video)
 

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I have never had to bleed a brake system or open the bleed screws any time Ive changed discs or pads and Ive done a fair few over the years. Id leave that side of it alone.
 

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I have never had to bleed a brake system or open the bleed screws any time Ive changed discs or pads and Ive done a fair few over the years. Id leave that side of it alone.
You did on the MkIIs, but I think you also had to change the brake fluid more often (they came with rubber? hoses and we eventually changed them over to metal ones, which solved the problem - this was nearly 30 years ago, so forgive the fuzziness), which may be why. Particularly while I wasn't tall enough to reach the brake pedal, 'my' job was always opening and shutting the bleeder valve. Still remember the day I finally got to pump the brakes instead! :)
Bleeding should only be necessary if you need to open the brake lines (or you find a leak), thereby exposing the brake fluid to air/moisture and introducing bubbles. Not a normal part of pad changes, especially on modern cars, but given the lockdown, probably best to be prepared.
If anyone is interested, I looked up the disc brake assembly on ETKA for the '87 Golf (ABS + vented discs version) for comparison with the Up! (likewise). Not miles off each other...

Golf:
4791


Up!:
4790
 

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No need to open bleed nipples, either use a pukka piston retractor, or I use an old 20" Dunlop tyre lever that puts even pressure on the piston when you force it back. I've been doing it ever since ABS became "de rigeur" and have never had an issue.
 

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Bleed nipples, in my experience, can be a pain in the a..e to loosen if left for years and years untouched. Talbot Sunbeam was a particular pig, ended up snapping both of them. So I like to look after my nipples, a wee touch every now and again, to keep them in tip top condition!
 

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Horses for courses! Some people swear by cracking a nipple when you push back the brake piston, others just force it back without doing so. Either way, take the lid off the brake fluid resevoir and put an old towel down in case of any spills before you start.

Both methods have there pros and cons and I have never had or heard of people going wrong with either.

Some people believe that by not cracking a nipple you are forcing brake fluid past the piston seals possibly damaging them and abs components and also not removing the small amount of brake fluid that has been repeatedly compressed. Others believe bleeding is pointless.

Out of choice, I tend to crack a nipple and do a brake fluid change at the same time.
 

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So it's pretty simple, once I'd fought with the locking wheel nut that some Muppet had over tightened:-(
It took 2 of us to undo it. One pushing the socket on, the other on the end of a 1m breaker bar.
You'll need a 7mm allen key to remove the caliper. A torx bit to remove the retaining screw on the disc. One needed a bit of persuasion with the impact driver.
I didn't bother with opening the bleed nipple. I use a ratchet g clamp to slowly compress the piston. It didn't need much, the original pads are obviously pretty hard. They weren't worn much.
That's about it really.
The state of the discs at 3yrs old and about 25k miles is shocking. The actual calipers are of pretty poor quality as well. Plus I'm really going to have to de salt the suspension and subframe and get some waxoyl on there. Lots of rust forming. Not impressed tbh.
Perversely it's still under warranty. But taking it to a dealer, fighting over brakes, what's wear and tear and what's covered under warranty in a Covid-19 situation simply wasn't worth It!
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Wow, those have had a hard life. Thanks for the info and the photos for when it comes time to attack mine.
 

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I believe VW use bog standard Mintex or Pagis discs which are of average quality. Worth upgrading to Brembo, Bosch or ATE which will be high carbon steel and shouldn't corrode as quickly.

I once got 80k out of 4 discs and pads on a Merc CLK but the steel then was obviously higher quality than some of the rubbish around today.

Must get round doing my rear pads and discs on our Passat once my OBDeleven device finally arrives!

Glad to hear you got it all sorted.
 
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