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I believe VW use bog standard Mintex or Pagis discs which are of average quality. Worth upgrading to Brembo, Bosch or ATE which will be high carbon steel and shouldn't corrode as quickly.

I once got 80k out of 4 discs on a Merc CLK but the steel then was obviously higher quality than some of the rubbish around today.

Must get round doing my rear pads and discs on our Passat once my OBDeleven device finally arrives!

Glad to hear you got it all sorted.
The guy at the motor factors told me VW use Mintex. I'd expect better from them. They didn't have Mintex in stock and given the lockdown was just about to start (I bought them a few weeks ago) I took the ones he had. I'd not heard of them, Modero, we'll see how they last. Can't be any worse:)
I hadn't driven it for a few months, it was horrific. Undrivable really.
The discs were absolutely goosed, but the pads had very little wear. So imho miss matched and poor quality.
I quite like Pagid, and never had issues like this. Well apart from lease cars which were always driven like I stole them:)
 

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My discs were the same after 20K, totally screwed and pads looked almost new. The slide/guide pins were absolutely filthy and not moving freely, causing the pads to be in constant contact with the discs. Generally you would have thought, in this situation, the pads would wear more quickly than the discs, but the OE discs seem to be of very inferior quality. I have never before had to change discs on such a low mileage car.
 

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My discs were the same after 20K, totally screwed and pads looked almost new. The slide/guide pins were absolutely filthy and not moving freely, causing the pads to be in constant contact with the discs. Generally you would have thought, in this situation, the pads would wear more quickly than the discs, but the OE discs seem to be of very inferior quality. I have never before had to change discs on such a low mileage car.
The guide pins were OK but the sliding surfaces on the calipers were badly corroded. Suggesting ours suffered the same as yours.
Not what I'd expect at 25k and 3yrs. So I'm thinking a strip down and clean every year looks like a good plan. Shouldn't be necessary but if that's how it is...
 

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Sadly, most cars these days are built to a tight budget and each component is sourced at the cheapest possible price. This means quality suffers and parts wear out quicker.

So when your VW dealer offers to replace your 25,000 mile worn/corroded discs and pads for say £250 per axle they will again fit average quality Mintex stuff that will wear out/corrode again in 2-3 years.

This is the reason I have done all my brake work for the last 15 years. A few basic tools and £125 per axle buys you better quality that should last you the 5 years/50k miles that decent quality OEM parts should last!

95% of consumable car parts are not made by car makers themselves. They buy from parts manufacturers, add a logo and a number and then add a 50-100% mark up!
 

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Sadly, most cars these days are built to a tight budget and each component is sourced at the cheapest possible price. This means quality suffers and parts wear out quicker.

So when your VW dealer offers to replace your 25,000 mile worn/corroded discs and pads for say £250 per axle they will again fit average quality Mintex stuff that will wear out/corrode again in 2-3 years.

This is the reason I have done all my brake work for the last 15 years. A few basic tools and £125 per axle buys you better quality that should last you the 5 years/50k miles that decent quality OEM parts should last!

95% of consumable car parts are not made by car makers themselves. They buy from parts manufacturers, add a logo and a number and then add a 50-100% mark up!
I'm afraid you're correct:-(
Weirdly cars get more reliable (generally) with every new model. But quality, under the skin, goes down as they manage to "develop" components that do the same job but for less cost. Quality is a real conundrum!
The last cars that I owned with, in my opinion, any depth of quality were a 1994 E Class W124 Merc. A 1991 G Wagen and a 1993 Audi Coupe. The first 2 I still owned until a couple of years ago. A bit of a trend there, early 1990's beyond that Merc. are generally extremely poor quality (particularly when they got in to bed with Chrysler) but sold at a premium. Audi? Well a downward spiral into either bland or brash:)
But back to the UP. I agree, there are some actions you can take yourself to engineer out the cheap/poor quality, and for a fraction of the cost. Good advice. Even if you don't feel able to do it yourself I'd advise building up a relationship with a decent independent garage. Doesn't have to be a VW specialist. Just because they call themselves that doesn't actually mean much. There's a BMW Specialist in our local town. They were the guys who did PDI and valeting at a BMW dealer:) You can then do your research and get them to fit the stuff you choose and/or go with their advice.
But the caliper!! Oh they are junk, so that's tricky.
 

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I think some of it is down to how long people keep cars for these days. 80% of new cars are bought on some sort of finance for 2-3 years (either HP, PCH, PCP or leased) then returned. So the consumable parts only need to last this long.

When the car is returned, the dealer will put on new discs and pads and any other items required for selling it on. These average quality parts will be bought using at a large discount from the manufacturers and so the cycle continues.

I tend to keep cars for longer so I prefer to invest a bit more in better quality parts and tyres when they wear out.

We once had a diesel ford C-Max which we put 200k miles on in 12 years. The only grief we ever had was when my wife locked both the keys and our son (then 1) in the car!
 

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I need to change the discs and pads on ours. I may get around to it tomorrow. If so I'll post some thoughts and maybe photos.
Bit disappointed. Discs are very badly warped at 25k miles. Very poor!!
Poor driving not parts, heavy breaking creates heat, heat expands the disc, continuous heavy breaking warps the discs and wears the pads. My Passat (heavier car) has 86K on the clock, original discs and 40% of the pads remaining. My Citigo has 40K on the clock, original discs and break pads, 50+% remaining. Google hypermiling.
 

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Poor driving not parts, heavy breaking creates heat, heat expands the disc, continuous heavy breaking warps the discs and wears the pads. My Passat (heavier car) has 86K on the clock, original discs and 40% of the pads remaining. My Citigo has 40K on the clock, original discs and break pads, 50+% remaining. Google hypermiling.
It used to be called "car sympathy"
 

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Poor driving not parts, heavy breaking creates heat, heat expands the disc, continuous heavy breaking warps the discs and wears the pads. My Passat (heavier car) has 86K on the clock, original discs and 40% of the pads remaining. My Citigo has 40K on the clock, original discs and break pads, 50+% remaining. Google hypermiling.
You have ZERO idea how it's been driven.
It's a good idea to have some clue about what you're talking about before making, what turns out to be, dumb uninformed comments:)
 

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Poor driving not parts, heavy breaking creates heat, heat expands the disc, continuous heavy breaking warps the discs and wears the pads. My Passat (heavier car) has 86K on the clock, original discs and 40% of the pads remaining. My Citigo has 40K on the clock, original discs and break pads, 50+% remaining. Google hypermiling.
We as a family have owned possibly in excess of 50 cars and motorbikes, I do all the maintenance including brakes, suspension, etc. I mentioned in my post that I have never had to change discs on such a low mileage car owned from new. There is certainly no doubt that the discs had extremely excessive wear for the mileage, the pads were almost still as new. I did also mention the guide pins were badly gunked up and were not freely moving, adding to the wear issue. BUT, these OE discs are shite, as I and others have stated. As for 'poor driving', please keep your daft opinions to yourself. Bit poor to join a forum and immediately become disrespectful in your opinions. Fair enough to make a general comment about poor driving habits can have a negative impact on certain car components, but not to specifically state that we who have made comment on the state of our discs, to be 'poor drivers'. Did not make my post in reply last night as I probably would have received a forum ban!
 

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We as a family have owned possibly in excess of 50 cars and motorbikes, I do all the basic maintenance including brakes, suspension, etc. I mentioned in my post that I have never had to change discs on such a low mileage car owned from new. There is certainly no doubt that the discs had extremely excessive wear for the mileage, the pads were almost still as new. I did also mention the guide pins were badly gunked up and were not freely moving, adding to the wear issue. BUT, these OE discs are shite. As for 'poor driving', please keep your daft opinions to yourself.
Analysing this some more.
There no doubt that the discs are poor quality. A mixture of excessive wear and corrosion is undeniable.
However, the caliper design is basic to say the least:) the sliding surfaces on mine were badly corroded. Bad enough at slightly under 3yrs old, but the actual machining of the sliding surfaces is poor, the way the pads are located is basic as well. So although the guide pins on ours were OK I do think the calipers were sticking.
Oh and hypermiling :rolleyes:
IMG-20180514-WA0000.jpg
 

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@Ed463 Thanks - any information would be useful. I just read that there are filters in the ABS system that can become clogged if sludge backflows into them. Apparently if you take about a minute or more to compress the piston, you should avoid this problem.
if you have sludge in your brake system then having it backflow in to the ABS system is the least of your worries..
I've had my own business for 30 years working on BMW's, and heard this tale of sludge being pushed back into the abs system many many times. Unless your vehicle has been neglected for many years there will be no sludge.
If there is sludge in the fluid then worrying about it being forced back into the ABS system is the least of your worries.
 

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I changed mine yesterday, it was very easy. I need to get a 7mm 1/2" bit since I dont want to use an allen key next time.

Just be sure to clean everything down with a wire brush, I was able to push my pistons back in prior to removal with a large screwdriver and then by hand. Just make sure to keep an eye on the brake fluid level if you have topped it up at all!

I wouldnt bother with any copperslip, there is to much risk of it touching the friction surface. they dont come with it globbed on like that from the factory for a reason! I see all these videos of people spreading it on the backside of the pads and all around the sliders, thats not going to do anything but cause an accident! the only place it should go is on the iron disk to iron hub mounting. Never on the alloy wheel to disk face, as the copperslip is the wrong formulation for that, you need something that is aluminium based.
 

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Nickel based anti seize paste. Has a melting point far higher than copperslip.
nothing to do with the melting points, its to do with galvanic corrosion. You dont really need any grease with modern pads, just clean everything well with a wire brush to ensure there are no particles or dust. You see posts where people slather that copper grease on the back of the pads like they are buttering their toast! and then put it on the SHIMS as well! so its 1mm apart from the friction disc face. these people need to be locked up!
 
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