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Discussion Starter #1
Being one of the older members here, I have got used to the idea of running in a new car before giving it a blast. Usually I will keep things below 4000 rpm, not stress the engine or gearbox and make sure I don't keep it at the same cruising speed without lifting off occasionally. What do other people here do? Is running in old fashioned nowadays?
 

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With modern engines, everything is pretty pre-run in before it reaches the dealership.

There's no real need to go easy for the first set period any more.

There will probably be a section in your handbook about 'Driving during the first 888 miles', but its really to protect the manufacturer more than the car.
 

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Although there is probably less need (compared to engines from ye olden days) to run in modern engines, it is still wise to take things easy for the first thousand miles or so. Ipersonallydid not rev the engine in my car much beyond 3000rpm during the first 1000 miles.

If you intend to keep the car for the long term, taking it easy when the car has just been 'unwrapped' will pay dividends later on (assumingregular oil changes etc). However, if you are only going to hang on to the car for three years or so...
 

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Both of the larger motorcycles I owned had specific instructions in the manuals advising the new owner to keep things gentle until the first service at 1,000 miles and then gently ease up the revs. Servicing was considerably more often than with a car, as well. Every 2,500 miles for the KTM Duke 2.

As for cars, I drove gently for the first 1,000 miles as usual. Perhaps in ten years time, we'll be able to see the difference.

This is a minefield, though, with conflicting stories from all sides.

Nick

Edited by: Collas
 

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I've just passed 550 miles and, as with every other new car I've owned, I haven't given it much thought and certainly haven't been keeping it under x rpm etc.

What I will do, and this isn't just during the 'run-in' period, is be gentle on the throttle and change up nice and early while the engine is still warming up. That's just courtesy to the oily/whirly bits though which have a tough old life.

I've seen subjective evidence at least that overly gentle use of a car during run-in can actually be bad for the long-term health of an engine.

This can be an emotive subject as people feel comfortable repeating 'home truths' about rev limits, avoiding full throttle etc., but speaking to engine builders and tuners (not just bolt-on merchants, proper developers, race teams etc.) over the years I know of failures that have occurred under 30k miles from engines that were pampered in early life (unusual cylinder wear leading to bore wash), and of 100k mile stripdowns of engines that were hammered from day zero that showed negligible wear.

All my cars have used less than the nominal amount of oil, have felt strong in use and have suffered no untoward failures of any interals or lubrication ancilleries. This includes an E-Class that had nearly 300k miles by the time it was sold and a number of Evos with over 100k miles, cars that 'pub experts' may tell you are fragile and very sensitive to regular maintenance and/or unable to cope with outputting >150hp/l for any length of time.

Small sample I know, but...

Besides, the Up makes such a fruity noise that it would be very hard to keep it under 3000rpm for 6 weeks!
 

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Talking to a rally meccanic friend of mine he says:

"Breaking in is quite useless, but shouldn't do any damage if you do it for the first 1000 or so km but will 'clog' the engine up if done on too a long distance and time. He always tells me the most important thing is engine warming at each use, do not switch the car on and let it warm up at idle (this will take twice as long and doesn't get the nice warm oil running round the engine as much). He always tells me to start it, give it 30-45 seconds in idle (so all metal expands a bit and oil moves a bit) and then stay under 2500rpm more or less untill engine reaches ideal temperature and then the oil isn't 'slugish' anymore and all metal parts have expanded to the right amount."



Edited by: scarja
 

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Discussion Starter #7
luckyjimmy said:
Although there is probably less need (compared to engines from ye olden days) to run in modern engines, it is still wise to take things easy for the first thousand miles or so. Ipersonallydid not rev the engine in my car much beyond 3000rpm during the first 1000 miles.

If you intend to keep the car for the long term, taking it easy when the car has just been 'unwrapped' will pay dividends later on (assumingregular oil changes etc). However, if you are only going to hang on to the car for three years or so...
I tend to agree with that. It surely eases in other running parts and certainly gearboxes will mesh in better after a period of careful drive and over run. As you suggest, I always try to treat a car as though I am keeping it for ever....though I rarely do!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all your views guys. The general concensus seems to be - go steady and let her warm up and don't be afraid to put the foot down a few times - without stressing the **** out of it until a 1000 or so miles. Like Collas, I had some big bikes and went fairly gently for a 1000 miles but it isn't easy to resist opening bikes like this up at times. They never suffered and didn't eat oil as a result.
 

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scarja said:
Talking to a rally meccanic friend of mine he says:

"Breaking in is quite useless, but shouldn't do any damage if you do it for the first 1000 or so km but will 'clog' the engine up if done on too a long distance and time. He always tells me the most important thing is engine warming at each use, do not switch the car on and let it warm up at idle (this will take twice as long and doesn't get the nice warm oil running round the engine as much). He always tells me to start it, give it 30-45 seconds in idle (so all metal expands a bit and oil moves a bit) and then stay under 2500rpm more or less untill engine reaches ideal temperature and then the oil isn't 'slugish' anymore and all metal parts have expanded to the right amount."

Spot on advice, I'd say.
 

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OK, let's see who's as old as me.

Who remembers that sign on the back of (I think) all new cars --- "Running in---Please Pass"
 

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My thinking is that short trips that do not heat the engine up properly, therefor I have taken a week off when I get my Up, and will attempt to do at least 1000miles in that week to break it in before I start my regular work week of short trips
 

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I'm pretty ancient and can remember my Dad having the running in sign on a Hillman Hunter (1973 in gold, cost £900 brand new).

I won't be keeping mine past 3 years so I let her rip from day one. As Juux says, who can resist that engine wanting to play?
 

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I drive gently for the first 1000 miles, and also for the first few minutes when the engine is cold (second point counts for the whole life of the car).

By 'gently' I don't only mean avoiding revving, but also avoiding 'lugging' an engine at high throttle opening, at low revs (e.g. in a high gear up an incline), which puts a lot of strain on bearings, etc.
 

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I remember them well. After the running inperiod we would change the sign to " Run In.... Now Try"

Happy Days!

Go Well.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Ecksile said:
OK, let's see who's as old as me.

Who remembers that sign on the back of (I think) all new cars --- "Running in---Please Pass"

Certainly do, Ecksile! In fact I had the sign on an MG TB after I had done the main bearings and big ends.
 

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There's a section in the user's manual on it. Here taken from the Citigo:

"Up to 1 000 kilometres:
—� Do not drive faster than 3/4 of the maximum speed of the gear in use, that is3/4 of the maximum permissible engine speed.
—� Do not use full throttle.
—� Avoid high engine revolutions.

From 1 000 up to 1 500 kilometres
—� Increase the power output of the engine gradually up to the full speed of thegear engaged, that is up to the maximum permissible engine revolutions.During the first operating hours the engine has higher internal friction than lateruntil all of the moving parts have harmonized. The driving style which you adopt
during the first approx.1 500 kilometres plays a decisive part in the success of running in your car."
 

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Whoops! That's mine knackered then
 

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The handbook says keep under 2500 revs and avoid full throttle for 1500km, my dealer told me this for 1500 miles. Hard to do I know, I think keeping the revs down until the engine warms up and varied driving conditions may be best when running in. Done 2000 miles now so don't have to think about it so much. When buying a second hand car, who asks how it was run in.
 
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