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Discussion Starter #1
Was driving on motorway yesterday and noticed a sharp pull to the left from steering, potentially dangerous , I've been driving for many years so kept cool, but a new driver may get confused. Stopped at a lay by and turned off engine, problem returned after 5 minutes. Anyway this morning everything was ok, was reading this forum about this happening after parking with full lock, remembered that yesterday i had done a sharp turn into a parking space and left it like that for an hour or so. Overnight car had been parked with wheel straight and no problems this morning.

So full lock parking can cause a problem with steering, i.e. Taking hands off wheel and car was trying to change lanes by itself. My car is a 2013 supplied in march. Think VW group need to look at thisEdited by: lumsdot
 

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Hi ,, cars do sometimes swerve on roads mostly worn out lanes where you have
congested heavy traffic your steering does slightly pull to the left mostly ,but as you say definitely
Needs sorting out ,it's like opening a can of worms when you are faced with steering problems .have you checked your wheels tyres .worth a look .you just never no ,Regards phill.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
When i stopped at lay by i checked tyres, all ok.
The power steering was trying to center at the 11 oclock position, so a sharp turn to left.
This happened for my 20 mile journey home, so i had to keep steering at 12 oclock position by holding steering wheel firmly. I.e. Nothing to do with road surface.
Steering was fine that morning and i had not hit any potholes, so the only thing that i can think of is me pulling sharply into car park space using a lot of lock.
My old honda jazz had lots of recalls , but for nothing that had affected me. If the vw ups clones have a problem with the electric mechanical power steering then this should be fixed. Steering is the most important thing on a car after brakes
 

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Morning ,if your steering is as bad as you say it is then you should not even attempt to drive
The car, I would be calling the dealer or road side assistance ASAP as it does not sound to good .
Surely your driving experience should give some experience of the problem you have ,
Also other drivers on the road could be in danger of your vehicle being on the road with the
Problem you say you have hope you get it sorted soon Regards Phill
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Steering is now ok, other threads mention the same problem, it happens occasionally after parking with full lock and then goes .problem is with electric power steering getting confused, so no mechanical breakages
Will contact local dealer and see if they have any info, but others have had no joy from dealers and since problem has now gone dealer will not be able to experience problem first hand.
Ive been driving for 25 years so am not trying to scare monger, just reporting what happened.
 

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Hi yes I have been in that position many many times ,Sod's law ,
Well it has made you a were of the problem ,have a nice day Regards Phill,
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Steering problem happened yesterday, parked in Jewson car park and did a sharp turn into parking space and think steering was at full lock. Drove away onto motorway and car started pulling to left. Stopped at lay by and switched off, problem still occurred. Ten minutes later parked in car park and switched off for five minutes and left car, came back and problem was ok. So it looks like car has to be switched off for more than a couple of minutes for power steering software to reset itself
 

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This is a common problem with cars with electrical power steering. There's no other fix than to make sure you don't leave your car with full lock whilst parked
 

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I think the recommendation is that you turn the wheels towards the kerb. It is not necessary to apply full lock. An alternative would be to leave the car in gear as well as applying the handbreak.
 

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Turn the wheels away from the kerb if you're facing uphill, towards if you're facing downhill. You don't have to apply full lock.

Personally I do the above and leave it in gear.
 

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I notice the handbook recommends that with the ASG you also leave it in D or R depending on wether you are facing uphill or downhill.
 

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When I owned my 2005 Seat Toledo, which had electro-mechanical steering, the steering light remained lit upon the instrument panel on numerous occasions. 

On each visit to the dealership, the workshop technicians claimed they could not detect a fault, subsequently choosing to remove the light from the instrument cluster, having completed the diagnostic test.  

The steering light continued to appear as the steering column was failing, on a vehicle with only 35,000 miles.  Moreover, a grating noise was also evident when the steering wheel was placed upon full-lock.  

When the fault was eventually diagnosed, shortly after the manufacturers' warranty had expired, the extended warranty only covered £600 of the £900, the dealership said it would cost to repair. 

Since Seat refused to pay the remaining £300, I requested a meeting with the dealership principle, where I stressed that the vehicle had been booked into the workshop on two previous occasions, for the same complaint, whilst the vehicle was under the full manufacturers' warranty.  

As an individual who works in an industry where intermittent faults are common-place, and, where measures are employed to locate the source of intermittent faults, with the intention of forcing the fault, so that it could be repaired, I explained that simply clearing the fault code, did not go far enough towards rectifying the recurring problem.  

Taking into consideration that the vehicle was recently outside its manufacturers' warranty, as we sat discussing the issue, the dealership principle agreed that I was right.  

Consequently, the dealership agreed to front the whole cost of replacing the steering column.  

In a nutshell, the moral of the above is that perseverance certainly pays dividends.  If your dealership continually ignores you, keep banging on the door.  















 

Edited by: Miserable Git
 
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