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Discussion Starter #1
Everybody I know slate new cars for the money you lose.


I'm due to get my Up on 1 September and it can't come soon enough!



The engine fell out of my Seat Leon Cupra R on Wedenesday, it literally did, it was on the floor held on by the driveshafts, exhaust and pipework!



The engine mountings disintegrated, I would have sold it two months ago but there were some jobs needed doing and it's been raining nearly every day and I just haven't been able to do them.



I have just added up my receipts for work carried out since 17 April this year and they come to £3,210.67!



It's a December 2002, I might as well have just broken it for spares in April, I want to cry!



At least I know that the sum total of my expenditure in the next three years (excluding fuel) will be £40 on road tax.



I'm loving my Cupra R right now, it's perfect, but I'll be so glad when it's gone.



To me, a new car seems to make perfect sense, especially now!
 

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Can of worms opened!


My view is that if you buy new and change your car every 1-3 years then you are pouring money down the drain.

These days we buy a new car, run it into the ground and then throw it away after around 10 years.

Our up! cost £10700 OTR and we are happy 'writing it off' over 10 years at around £1.1k a year.

If we were to change like for like every 3 years then that figure would be around 1.8k (give or take a bit) each year.

Plenty of slack in the above figures for any post warranty repairs by keeping the car longer ie £7k over 7 years.

I dare say there will be plenty of other different views though.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'm just looking forward to a break!


I'm going to think about what to do in 30 months time, I can't see me having another new car, my one will have less than 20,000 miles on it in all likelyhood and it will only have been driven by me and I have lots of vehicle sympathy!



I think at five years I'll change again for new.
 

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Buying a new car is not the most economical way to get around, but it is nice actually getting the car you want in good nick and with a guarantee.
 

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No car is an inventment. The only car modern that has gone up in value is not a Ferrari or a Porsche, but the BMW E30 M3 Sport Evo.

A car does however, fill a requirement to get to point A to point B. Therefore the logical choice for every person is a cheapest car on the market, the Nissan Pixo.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Although, I have just seen a 1995 Nissan Primera with 338,000 miles on the clock for £175 on a popular internet auction site, is the Pixo cheaper than that?
 

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that is the alternate way of going. buying a really cheap car and hoping it doesnt fail.

there is method in your maddness, because instead of spending £3k on a £200 car, one can simply buy another banger!

the two other factors is how long you can keep this up over the lifetime of a new car (5-10 years), to ensure you are not worse off, and the asthetic appeal of driving a £200 for 10 years!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I haven't spent £3k on a banger, my Leon is mint and I take pride in not selling a dog to someone, I need it to be perfect, I couldn't do anything else.


I won't be buying the Nissan Primera or the Pixo, I'm happy with the Up that I should have in three weeks.
 

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matt-drummer said:
It's been repaired at great expense, it's new,we've replaced everything.


What's your idea of mint then?
1 mile on the clock and spent its life in a garage. preferably in a moisture resistant sealed tent.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Ok, it's not then, but it's very good for it's age, if that's a better way of descrbing it.


I really hope you enjoy your Up.
 

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matt-drummer said:
It's been repaired at great expense, it's new,we've replaced everything.


What's your idea of mint then?
My understanding of mint - which matches the dictionary definition - is as new, indistinguishable from new, without any marks. I don't mind Joe Public using the word to mean "in good condition" but it does annoy me when a shop describes items as mint, when they have obvious signs of use.
 

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VWXYZ said:
Can of worms opened!


My view is that if you buy new and change your car every 1-3 years then you are pouring money down the drain.

These days we buy a new car, run it into the ground and then throw it away after around 10 years.

Our up! cost £10700 OTR and we are happy 'writing it off' over 10 years at around £1.1k a year.

If we were to change like for like every 3 years then that figure would be around 1.8k (give or take a bit) each year.

Plenty of slack in the above figures for any post warranty repairs by keeping the car longer ie £7k over 7 years.

I dare say there will be plenty of other different views though.
I largely agree with you.

A Daily Telegraph journalist, Mike Rutherford, thinks you can save large mounts of money by buying 10 year old cars. Some people say new cars are a mug's game. I disagree.

The problem with 10 year old cars is that city cars are only designed to last 7 or 8 years, and at 10 years they suffer rust, and fall apart, unless owned by a granny who drove it once a week on a nice long run to get the engine warmed up. Posh cars do last longer, but they burn fuel, and components cost a fortune. And you need to know what you are buying with old cars. Ones on dealer's forecourts cost a fortune, and non-main dealer's are dubious, unless you know cars. If you can buy your aunt's lovingly maintained 8 year old VW Polo, good for you. And if you can maintain cars, then perhaps used is better. But I would rather not buy a banger, then have the hassle of a breakdown on the way to work, and then being without a car, and not earning money. I had a 4 year old Nissan Micra and the purchase cost divided by the number of years owned was no more than for a new Ford Ka I kept for 10 years, actually it was a lot more! The new car was cheaper. Eh?

Buy new, and you get a known quantity with a 3 year warranty, and one driver. If you drive it well, it should last 8 years, assuming 15,000 miles per year. It might last longer, if you are lucky, not too much salt on the road, and so on. But also when you buy new, you get a car that works, and is safer than an old banger. The Up has 5 NCAP stars. Make sure it is properly serviced, and you get a good reliable drive for 8+ years. After that, service costs can escalate.

Oh and new cars sometimes have better mpg. The Up has new technology, so can save money over older alternatives. And less road tax too.

And you can buy some cars at big discounts from brokers such as DriveTheDeal.com. So I could have had a new Ford Fiesta for £8,300. Some dealers sell 1 year old used examples for that money. Eh? But I thought the VW UP was the better car.
 

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One factor you have forgotten.... Reliability... I need a cast iron warranty that fixes the far if it breaks and keeps me mobile in the interim. My older cars were just not that reliable. ESP in my line of work
 

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Cars certainly change over the years. My beetle had 46bhp 1300 cc and 26 mpg. Yes 26.

http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Mini-Traveller.JPG

i learned to drive in an 850 mini just like the above. No brakes, no safety features, windows slid front to back, no suspension. No power. It was great fun though. My mate had an 850 automatic mini and that was pedestrian. Also another mate had a reliant supervan III (delboy car) Anything over 40 and you were deafened and living with your life in your hands.

Another modern car had pneumatic window wipers. They worked off the inlet manifold. Press your foot hard on the power (!) and the wipers stopped on the screen.

Eeeee those were the days.

Privatedoc, you are right, reliability is everything in some jobs!
 

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VWXYZ said:
Our up! cost £10700 OTR and we are happy 'writing it off' over 10 years at around £1.1k a year.
I completely agree. This is what we did with our new beetle, although a slightly higher purchase cost, we kept it for an extra year and then got a reasonable trade in. It never really cost us any money in that time. I would have been quite happy keeping it for longer, but the cost of petrol and tax made me look at a cheaper alternative (that and the fear of future repair bills).

If money was no object I would change every three years if I could find something I liked just as much. I like new things and gadgets
But in our house hubby treats the car as an unnecessary expense (he's a cyclist)
 

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The bodywork on modern cars is very resistant to rust if washed regularly, as is the chassis, but manufacturers seems to ignore the suspension and steering components, probably because they're so thick that by the time they rust away the car's lifespan will be over. I don't like seeing rust anywhere, so I took two days and treated my car with Waxoyl on the first day of ownership. I was covered in the stuff, but it should do the trick when the salt gritters hit the roads this Winter



http://s124.photobucket.com/albums/p22/ujoni08/silverboy/?action=view¤t=PICT3315.jpg






Edited by: move up!
 

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move up! said:
The bodywork on modern cars is very resistant to rust if washed regularly, as is the chassis, but manufacturers seems to ignore the suspension and steering components, probably because they're so thick that by the time they rust away the car's lifespan will be over. I don't like seeing rust anywhere, so I took two days and treated my car with Waxoyl on the first day of ownership. I was covered in the stuff, but it should do the trick when the salt gritters hit the roads this Winter


http://s124.photobucket.com/albums/p22/ujoni08/silverboy/?action=view&current=PICT3315.jpg

http://s124.photobucket.com/albums/p22/ujoni08/silverboy/?action=view&current=PICT3316.jpg

did you really put Waxoyl on an aluminum gearbox assembly? that will not rust anyway! looks like you coated it with sh*t.

enjoy having no warranty on your underbody now as all VW have to do is claim you did not ensure the surface is dry when your underbody rusts

Edit: the directions on my waxyol tin say not to apply to any mechanical components. you do not have to coat mechanical components such as shocks, springs and wishbones. there are two reasons for this. first, they are replaceable with common parts (obvious), and second, in some cars they may act as a sacrificial metal component in the car when it does rust

Edited by: tom
 
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