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Discussion Starter #1
Over the past few weeks, with the impending introduction of the new VW Polo, I'd given serious consideration towards upgrading my UP! as I'd become both tired and annoyed by the levels of road/engine noise that entered the cabin.

In all other respects, however, I couldn't be happier with how my High UP! has performed throughout the past nine months of ownership.

As I sat in front of the computer, working my way through the VW configurator, a realisation started to emerge that in order to continue to enjoy the vast array of driver convenience features from which my 2013 High Up currently benefits, I'd have to upgrade to a Polo SE Design, which would cost in excess of £15K to finance.

Granted, I was also considering the needs of others, too, since my wife has grown wholly accustomed to the luxury of being able to press that little button on the dashboard that warms the seats on a cold morning; a novelty that I doubt will ever cease.

Upon conducting some arithmetic, in order to upgrade to a Polo SE Design, I realised that I'd be paying in the region of an extra £50 per month in finance, on top of additional fuel, insurance (upon expiry of the year's free) and road tax throughout the term of the PCP agreement.

Upon considering how much extra I'd need to pay, in order to achieve a quiet ride, I've set about exploring the world of vehicle sound-proofing, since the lack of insulation afforded to the UP! is my only complaint.

Having researched vehicle sound-proofing, I've discovered a company (ultimatecarservices.co.uk) who have a workshop, close to my home address, who offer to fully soundproof a vehicle from £600 upwards.

I've not contacted them yet, as my wife would no doubt kill me if I spent our holiday money on vehicle soundproofing but I do intend to obtain a quote, once we return from our holiday.

In the mean time, in order to reduce the level of noise entering the cabin from the rear, as a budget sound-proofing option, I've purchased a 1" thick roll of acoustic sound deadening foam, which I've used to line the wheel well and boot area of my UP! which I installed yesterday afternoon.

Upon test driving my UP! in the rain, the familiar, yet equally intrusive noise that entered the cabin from the rear, when driving in the rain, appeared hugely subdued.

Granted, an audible level could still be heard but the noise appeared to be restricted to the sound of spray up the tailgate, accompanied by the occasional "swish" as my UP! travelled over surface water.

As I hit 60mph on a dual carriageway I was also able to listen to music from Ludivco Einaudi, a classical pianist, in comfort without needing to increase the volume, as I had to previously, when listening to music while driving in the rain.

I've also managed to find a company, based in Manchester (www.nkgroup.co.uk), who manufacture custom built engine sound-proofing, with prices starting at £55.00.

Again, I'm yet to contact the company, but I intend to upon return from my holiday.

Even if I spend £1000 on sound-proofing, it'll save me a £2400 plus extras during the lifetime of upgrading to a Polo SE Design.
Edited by: Miserable Git
 

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Hi there, i've been thinking about doing something similar to my boot/rear wheel arches so i'm glad it's not only me and your efforts have worked. Time to research some supplies
 

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Lots of people swear by Dynamat for sound and heat insulation. It's widely used in Vw camper vans etc, I've not used it but intend to soon in my camper (and possibly my Up)
 

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We all who have owned small cars like Toyota Aygo, Citroen C1, and Peugeot107 have sucessfully sound proofed our cars with Dynamat like bitumen pads (from home depot shops and a lot cheaper). The places to sound proof are rear wheel arches, rear boot, A, B and C pillars and finally the floor of the car. some even sound proof the door panels. With most of that done you will have a quieter car.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I appreciate the input, guys. It makes me feel a little better knowing that I'm not the only one who has questioned, in my opinion, the Up's only flaw.
 

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Can someone please add a link to a product and a picture of your easiest fix with most effect?

My up is my first car and I have had it less than two week but I have also noticed the noise.
 

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My red High Up has not been built yet, but reading these posts has convinced me to research sound deadening options ahead of collection. I think I might go for this stuff at Halfords http://www.halfords.ie/sat-nav-audio/car-audio/stereo-fitting-accessories/vibe-sound-deadening-material-roll-32x18

However not sure I fancy the hassle of removing A, B and C pillar trim or worse remove the door trims. Is it tricky to do? Might just settle for covering the boot and rear wheel arches and see whether that makes a difference.
 

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I was always told to believe half of what you see and nothing of what you hear. Before going overboard and at the risk of over reaction why not wait until you have driven your car before you decide what if anything needs to be done. Personally I have not felt the need to do anything and have no issues that need such action. However having convinced yourself of a problem you are more likely to find one.
 

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That's sound advice Beevee (pun intended). Yes I'm certainly not going to jump into tacking on unnecessary bits of soundproofing on to my nice new Up. Part of me was wondering how VW could get something so basic so wrong. Also on test drive it didn't seem very noisy & unrefined. Will wait until I get to know the car. Thanks again.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
As a former owner of luxury German marques, I've grown used to a certain level of interior comfort.

Whilst I find the UP! fantastic in every other aspect, my only complaint is that I consider it somewhat flawed by its lack of noise insulation, most notably in areas such as the rear wheel arches, bulkhead and under the hood, thus, allowing noise to enter the cabin.

By contrast, car critics have not been shy in enthusing about how well insulated the newly released Hyundai i10 is from road noise, a vehicle that What Car awards five stars, alongside the UP!

The addition of rear wheel arches and under-hood insulation on the Up! would probably add an extra £100 to the purchase price, which, in the life-time of a finance agreement is negligible.

I feel that the lack of soundproofing is something that VW need to address if the UP! is to remain a popular choice as city car, particularly since the i10 is cheaper to buy.

If VW fail to address the problem, I see the UP! suffering a similar fate to that endured by the Lupo and the Fox.

As the UP! finds itself in a hugely competitive market, where customers have been forced to down-size, due to the tightening of finances, whilst still seeking a certain level of craftsmanship, VW can no longer rely upon its badge in order to meet sales targets; it has to compete with the likes of Kia, Hyundai, et al by producing vehicles that are better than the mainstream manufacturers, if it wants to continue to charge a premium.

The Korean manufacturers are after the market share, in all sectors, that has long been enjoyed by the Germans, hence, the reason they've poached a number of former VW/Audi designers, to design vehicles for the European market.

Of the 'city cars' I see on the road, here in the UK, the sight of a Hyundai i10 or a Kia Picanto is far mare common than that of a VW UP!











Edited by: Miserable Git
 

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Well Mr Miserable you may well be right about the noise level of the Up but give me the fundamentally better engineered drive of a solid German car any time ahead of any Korean wannabe.

Nothing like independent measurement to settle the argument!

To be scientific about it, I've downloaded a free iPhone app called Decibel Meter. Using this placed on the passenger seat of my Merc, it gives an average reading of 77-78 DB with little difference when sampled at 40kph 60kph and 100 kph. When I collect my Up I'm going to run comparison tests using the same app.

If there is a material difference I will be visiting my local Halfords pronto and then the interesting part will be measuring again after extra sound deadening to see if it improves.

But will only be applying sound proofing if the Up is significantly noisier than my Merc as I think the ear adjusts anyway.
 

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Don't measure as soon as you get the car as tyres can take around 1000 miles to bed in to the camber the car is set with.
My 2014 Focus has 17" wheels & Continental Sport Contact 2 tyres. When new the noise was intolerable on poor road surfaces. It is now just bad!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
DesB, I too would always choose to purchase a German manufactured vehicle over a Korean competitor.

Having worked for Audi, in my late teens-early twenties, I gained both an understanding and an appreciation as to the reasons why German manufacturers charged a premium, over their mass-market competitors.

Moreover, I'd like to add that my one criticism of the UP is not based upon its drive or handling, which, I think is fantastic on both counts, my criticism of the UP! rests upon its aesthetics, which, in my case, is the lack of soundproofing afforded to the Up!

In such a competitive and emerging market, in which the UP! finds itself, where lesser manufacturers are introducing vehicles with greater levels of insulation than that of the UP! if VW want its entry model to remain competitive, it needs to resolve the issue regarding its lack of soundproofing.














Edited by: Miserable Git
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I've also downloaded a decibel meter app, so I'll test it in my UP! while driving around later today
 

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We'll done MG both on your love of German cars and also I was really hoping you would offer to test the decibel level of your Up.

For comparison, I got a 78 DB result in my Merc (1) placing the iPhone on the front passenger seat (2) on a reasonably busy motorway (M50 Dublin morning rush hour) with some noise from nearby vehicles (3) on a dry day (4) at 100kph

These comparisons could be fun and constructive.

What triggered me downsizing to an Up (as well as a secondhand sellers market coming out of the economy crash) was the fact that I found my wife's new base petrol Golf just as refined as the Merc and far more fun and engaging to drive. I must test the Golf at 100kph today too.

Another interesting benchmark ˜ƒ I've just got out of bed and my wife's snores were peaking at 77 DB too!

Happy testing!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The Golf is wonderfully civilised car, achieving top marks when reviewed by motor critics, in terms of its build quality and its driving ability.

As a result, VW is able to justify the price tag that the Golf attracts, both new and used, over rivals in the same sector such as the Ford Focus and the Vauxhall Astra.

I hope that your wife is as pleased with the purchase as you appear to be.

As for the decibel meter app, I've not had the opportunity to test it over the weekend, as my wife has been using the car but I hope to test it tomorrow.

However, during research into vehicle sound-proofing products, I've discovered that an increase of 10db equates to an approximate increase of 30% in terms of the level of noise that one is likely to hear.

Something to consider, when I get the opportunity to post my results.
 

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Well Mr Git, I completely agree with you on the Golf. I can actually remember when the Mk I was introduced (as it whizzed past my pram
).Ever since Ihave always considered it as a baby Merc. But my results indicate it is better than my Merc!!

The base Golf 1.2L petrol comes in at 70 Db at a dry motorwayspeedof 100KPH




This compares to the Merc E 220CDI at 77 Dbat a dry motorwayspeedof 100KPH !!!




I always felt the Golf was easily as refined as the Merc but this really shocked me. However when I think about it maybe I shouldn't be surprised - after all the Merc is a 4 cylinder diesel and petrol should be quieter. It speaks volumes (ouch!) about the sound proofing quality inherent in the Golf.

On the last post, Googling around indicates that 70Db is twice as loud as 60 Db.

Will be very interesting to see how the UP compares.



Edited by: DesB
 

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Discussion Starter #20
The level of soundproofing, thus creating a comfortable driving environment is what is it comes down to at the end of the day.

Granted, a petrol engined vehicle will, more often than not, always be quieter than a diesel engine,

I've no idea how you were able to upload images from your db meter but from the same app I've downloaded, I've recorded an average of 81db when travelling between 30-40 mph, with a peak of 96db.

If your googling is correct, suggesting that an increase of 10% in db is 50% louder, the readings I've recorded in my UP! while traveling at the speeds mentioned above, would suggest that the UP! is around 20% louder travelling at 40mph/64kph than your Merc is when travelling at 60mph/100kph.

Sadly, that db figure is only going to increase as you put your foot to the floor in the UP!.









Edited by: Miserable Git
 
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